Browse Prior Art Database

Human Presence Detector for Computer Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110471D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coulombe, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A computer system does not know whether or not a human is present or utilizing its display screen or other human interface, unless that human is actively engaged in using the interface. This can be a problem in that the computer does not know whether it can shut off or down power the interface function in order to conserve power, prevent unauthorized use, etc.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Human Presence Detector for Computer Systems

      A computer system does not know whether or not a human is
present or utilizing its display screen or other human interface,
unless that human is actively engaged in using the interface.  This
can be a problem in that the computer does not know whether it can
shut off or down power the interface function in order to conserve
power, prevent unauthorized use, etc.

      We propose adding a sensor to an integral component of the
computer, such as the computer terminal screen.  This component,
similar to those used in electronic doors, will sense if a human is
within a certain range of the device, and therefore, within a certain
range of the computer interface.  Additionally, users should be able
to specify and manipulate the distance that the sensor detects, to
customize the behavior of the sensor to correspond more naturally to
their working habits.  When a user is detected, the computer will
remain available for a user to respond to information and prompts
through the computer interface.  If there is status information that
a user has requested, it can be continually updated.  Also, any other
process that a user has initiated that serves simply as information
for the user is shown and processed.

      As soon as the user is no longer detected, the computer can
start to limit the information that it does not need in order to
conserve computing power.  For example, a clock can be removed, as it
serves (ofte...