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Browse Prior Art Database

Ink Jet Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110547D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sugita, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a printing technique for ink jet printing. The technique, which enables ink jet printing to achieve lower cost with simple structure, uses heat energy to vaporize a small portion of the ink to eject a drop through an orifice. However, this technique has no heating element such as thin film heater resistor resident in the printhead. The resistive ink functions as a heater instead of thin film heater resistor.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Ink Jet Printing

       Disclosed is a printing technique for ink jet printing.
The technique, which enables ink jet printing to achieve lower cost
with simple structure, uses heat energy to vaporize a small portion
of the ink to eject a drop through an orifice.  However, this
technique has no heating element such as thin film heater resistor
resident in the printhead.  The resistive ink functions as a heater
instead of thin film heater resistor.

      The figure shows a schematic view of the printhead.  The ink
chamber 4 fills up with the liquid resistive ink 1 which contains
particles of carbon-black and electrolytes.  The exposed electrodes
2a, 3a are placed in the opposite sides of the ink chamber.  The
insulation layers 5a, 5b isolate electrically the ink 1 and the
electrode layers 2, 3 which are placed on the base plates 9a, 9b.

      In order to print, electrical current is passed between the
electrodes 2a and 3a as required through the ink 1.  Due to
electrical resistance to current flow existing within the ink 1, the
ink 1 becomes heated and vaporizes a small portion of itself. The
resulting vapor expansion gives momentum to the ink, causing the drop
of ink 7 to be propelled from the orifice 6 and onto the paper 8.
Capillary forces cause the ink chamber to refill with ink.