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Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Interface Emulator for Generic SCSI Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110573D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bealkowski, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a technique for providing a disk-compatible interface on certain non-disk devices.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Disk Interface Emulator for Generic SCSI Devices

       This article describes a technique for providing a
disk-compatible interface on certain non-disk devices.

      The basic input output system (BIOS) found in personal computer
systems typically provides a disk interface.  The BIOS disk interface
is a well established standard.  A small computer system interface
(SCSI) adapter supports disk devices and other types of devices.  One
of the other types of SCSI devices is a read/write optical storage
device.  The BIOS interface for accessing other types of SCSI
devices, such as an optical storage device, is a separate and
distinct interface (generic SCSI interface) from the disk interface.
Software, such as an operating system, is required to provide
additional program code to interface to the generic SCSI interface.
Access to an optical storage device is typically done through a
device driver.  It is required to load the operating system, at least
in part, before the device driver can be loaded.

      The preliminary stages of loading an operating system, such as
directly after power is applied to a computer system, is called
bootstrap load or simply boot.  Built into the computer system is a
means to load an initial record, called a boot record, into the
system.  The source device of the boot record is typically a direct
access storage device (DASD).  Diskette, disk and optical storage are
examples of DASD.  A typical operating system (such as a DOS
operating system for personal computers) boot record contains
instructions capable of loading additional records from disk or
diskette devices.  In order for an operating system to boot from an
...