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Customizable Four Pane Layout for Database Table Definition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110584D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banning, K: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Disclosed is a four-pane matrix that would assist the user in defining a database table. Database table definition involves numerous sub-object definitions that can easily be lost or forgotten by the user if the definition is done in a prompted or rigorously sequential manner. Even when a sub-object definition is laid side by side with another sub-object (like a column definition matrix or similar control), an additional object definition cannot be shown to the user by the same interface. This four-pane layout would be able to display to the user each of the four sub-object types associated with table objects and allow the user to customize the contents of each pane.

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Customizable Four Pane Layout for Database Table Definition

       Disclosed is a four-pane matrix that would assist the
user in defining a database table.  Database table definition
involves numerous sub-object definitions that can easily be lost or
forgotten by the user if the definition is done in a prompted or
rigorously sequential manner.  Even when a sub-object definition is
laid side by side with another sub-object (like a column definition
matrix or similar control), an additional object definition cannot be
shown to the user by the same interface.  This four-pane layout would
be able to display to the user each of the four sub-object types
associated with table objects and allow the user to customize the
contents of each pane.

      Database tables consist of four major sub-objects: columns, the
primary key, foreign keys, and indexes.  Other items are part of its
properties, such as the table comment, and they can be defined
without the user needing direct knowledge of the major sub-objects.
Columns are the base sub-objects, those that all the other
sub-objects require for their definition.  When defined, the one
primary key for the table is composed of columns.  Foreign keys and
indexes also use columns as part of their definitions.  If a table
has a primary key already defined for it, the user can also create a
new foreign key that is dependent on the primary key of the same
table definition.

      Since sub-objects require the definition of other sub-objects,
a table definition interface that allows a user to view all four
sub-objects at the same time would assist the user in constructing
the table and accelerate the time needed for completion of the
definition.  One such example of a four-pane layout fo...