Browse Prior Art Database

Non-destructive Electromagnetic Absorber Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110616D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kiciak, PA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The presently disclosed technique and probe provide a cost effective means of measuring properties of dielectric materials, in order to determine their potential usefulness as absorber linings for electromagnetic test chambers. The measurements can be made in a non-destructive manner (i.e., without potentially damaging a chamber or destroying a sample of the absorber material which may be needed for further analysis).

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Non-destructive Electromagnetic Absorber Probe

       The presently disclosed technique and probe provide a
cost effective means of measuring properties of dielectric materials,
in order to determine their potential usefulness as absorber linings
for electromagnetic test chambers. The measurements can be made in a
non-destructive manner (i.e., without potentially damaging a chamber
or destroying a sample of the absorber material which may be needed
for further analysis).

      Electromagnetic test chambers are used to measure
electromagnetic emissions from devices undergoing tests.  Walls of
the chamber are lined with dielectric absorber material which must
minimize the amount of energy reflected back into the chamber from
the walls (i.e., minimize detectable energy not directly issuing from
the device undergoing test).  The present technique and probe provide
a practical means of determining absorption characteristics
(dielectric constant and conductivity) of (variously impregnated)
different materials, which may be useful as absorber media, without
completely lining a chamber with each material or destructively
measuring a sample of that material (which may be needed for further
use or analysis after its testing).

      As shown in the illustration, the probe comprises a conductive
tip (conductor #1) attached to a conductive disk-shaped member
(conductor #2) by means of a non-conductive connector.  The tip is
inserted into the material which is to be tested until the material
is in contact with the disk member.  Material dimensions are not
critical, so long as the material is large enough to contain a
significant amount of electric field energy.  Dimensions of the probe
are selected to minimize distributed or transmission line effects
attributable to the probe itself, over the frequency range of
interest.  In addition, tip diam...