Browse Prior Art Database

Actuator Lock/ Crash Stop Utilizing Solenoids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110620D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kitahori, H: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for using a solenoid as an actuator lock and crash stop for hard disk drives. A magnet is attached to the actuator. When this enters the solenoid, voltage is generated. By consuming this power, the magnet will be decelerated and, therefore, the actuator, also. When releasing the actuator, a current would be run in the solenoid in a way so that the magnetic force in the solenoid would be reduced. Then, the actuator can be released easily.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Actuator Lock/ Crash Stop Utilizing Solenoids

       Disclosed is a technique for using a solenoid as an
actuator lock and crash stop for hard disk drives. A magnet is
attached to the actuator.  When this enters the solenoid, voltage is
generated. By consuming this power, the magnet will be decelerated
and, therefore, the actuator, also.  When releasing the actuator, a
current would be run in the solenoid in a way so that the magnetic
force in the solenoid would be reduced.  Then, the actuator can be
released easily.

      The actuator lock is a mechanism in a HDD (Hard Disk Drive)
that locks the actuator which carries the magnetic head in an area
where no data is written when the HDD is not in use.  The crash stop
is a mechanism that defines the boundaries for actuator movement.
When the HDD malfunctions, it decelerates the actuator gradually so
that neither the head nor disk is damaged.  In some HDDs, one
mechanism serves both as the actuator lock and crash stop for
compactness.

      Fig. 1 shows the principle of the disclosed technique. The
magnet 1 will enter the coil 2.  The generated power will be consumed
and, therefore, the magnet will be decelerated and locked to the
steel chip 3.  The coil 2 and the electric circuit will reduce the
magnetic force for easy release.  Fig. 2 shows an example of an
implementation of this principle.  The magnet 5 is attached to the
actuator 4.  A steel chip 6 and the coil are mounted on the base of
the HDD.