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Atomic Force Microscope with High Dynamic Range using Bunny or Dopy Balls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110650D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gimzewski, JK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The dynamic range of an atomic force microscope can be greatly enhanced by using a tip with a buckminsterfullerene molecule at its apex.

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Atomic Force Microscope with High Dynamic Range using Bunny or Dopy Balls

       The dynamic range of an atomic force microscope can be
greatly enhanced by using a tip with a buckminsterfullerene molecule
at its apex.

      Buckminsterfullerene molecules are cage-shaped carbon clusters
with new properties.  The soccerball C60 molecule provides a very
homogeneous charge distribution and has a very high compressibility.
C60 can be transformed into bunny balls by breaking the double bonds
of neighboring C atoms and fixing different molecular species to one
ball, in other words, adding one or more ears of a bunny onto it.
Another modification of the bucky ball is obtained through replacing
a C atom by boron or nitrogen.  Such doped C59B bucky balls have
recently been synthesized and termed dopy balls.

      One or more of the aforementioned balls of related fullerene
derivatives may be chemically fixed to the apex of a tip or probe
structure of a scanning probe micro-scope (SPM).  As an example, the
advantages of such a construction over an atomic force microscope
(AFM) with a conventional stylus-type tip usually made from silicon
are:
1.  The bunny ball or dopy ball tip is soft, whereas the conventional
tip is rigid. Hence, the bunny ball (dopy ball) tip is less
destructive.  This is of particular importance when the tip is used
with biological matter.
2.  The stiffness of the conventional tip limits the range of force
measurements in AFM, which however is...