Browse Prior Art Database

Microdosing System of Silicon for Adhesive Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110658D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 98K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Elsner, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a microdosing system with a microscreen mask of silicon, by which an adhesion point pattern in the micrometer range is applied to a substrate over a large area. This may be done in a single dosing step, so that the time required for mounting active and passive components is drastically reduced.

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Microdosing System of Silicon for Adhesive Coating

       This article describes a microdosing system with a
microscreen mask of silicon, by which an adhesion point pattern in
the micrometer range is applied to a substrate over a large area.
This may be done in a single dosing step, so that the time required
for mounting active and passive components is drastically reduced.

      Present surface mounting techniques provide for active and
passive components to be glued to the substrate, board or card
surface and to be subsequently electrically wired, using, for
example, Au wires.  The adhesion points are created by a fine hollow
needle attached to a tank containing the adhesive.  The amount of
adhesive applied is controlled more or less accurately by the stroke
of a piston.  In this manner, adhesion patterns may be produced in a
single dispense mode.  The dosable minimum amount of adhesive with
this method is about 0.1 mm3, i.e., 0.1 ml.

      Recently microdosing heads have been introduced which consist
of a thin-walled glass tube surrounded by a piezoceramic tube.  Upon
application of a voltage between the inner and the outer electrode,
the ceramic tube contracts, compressing the glass tube and producing
the required overpressure inside.  This technology yields droplets in
the nanoliter range.

      However, neither of these techniques is suitable for producing
an adhesion point pattern over a large area in a single dispense
step.

      For this purpos...