Browse Prior Art Database

Static Solder Bath Oil Changing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110665D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banks, PM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a design of a solder bath including an oil sump with a detachable sluice gate to assist in the removal of dross oil from rotary solder dip processing without the delay and cost of cooling down. Reduced solder bath downtime and improved human safety result.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Static Solder Bath Oil Changing

       Disclosed is a design of a solder bath including an oil
sump with a detachable sluice gate to assist in the removal of dross
oil from rotary solder dip processing without the delay and cost of
cooling down.  Reduced solder bath downtime and improved human safety
result.

      An embodiment comprises a modified solder bath 1 and a sluice
gate 2 machined from stainless steel.  With conventional solder bath
equipment, soldering oil must be removed from the solder surface when
hot using a ladle to skim-off most of the oil and then soaking up
final patches of oil with paper towel.  For transfer to
manufacturing, an existing equipment was modified to include an oil
sump 3 attached to the main solder bath 1 by a welded joint 4 shown
in Fig. 1.  The sluice gate 2A was fabricated so as to slide over the
solder bath-oil sump joining piece 4, as shown in Fig. 2, a cut-away
view of the sump end of bath 1.

      In operation, the solder bath 1 is filled with solder to level
A and the sluice gate 2 is lowered into position 2B (using a
detachable handle which locates in holes (not shown) at the top of
the gate).  When positioned, the lower edge 5 of the mating surface
of the gate extends below level A.  Soldering oil is added to the
solder bath 1 as required, typically to a depth of a few mm (i.e.,
below the upper edge 6 of the mating surface of the sluice gate 2A).
The oil is thus retained on the solder surface by the sealing action
of the solder itself preventing flow under the gate along its longest
dimension, and the mechanical seal of the gate's wings...