Browse Prior Art Database

Interactive, Area sSnsitive Navigation Icon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110677D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haynes, TR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the current art, a user may interact with graphical container icons in a very limited manner; the user may select the icon which targets it as the subject of subsequent action, or open the application represented by the icon by mouse-clicking on it. The icon is typically static in appearance and interaction, and mouse interaction is limited to actions affecting the entire icon, not parts thereof.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Interactive, Area sSnsitive Navigation Icon

       In the current art, a user may interact with graphical
container icons in a very limited manner; the user may select the
icon which targets it as the subject of subsequent action, or open
the application represented by the icon by mouse-clicking on it.  The
icon is typically static in appearance and interaction, and mouse
interaction is limited to actions affecting the entire icon, not
parts thereof.

      This article extends the basic icon capabilities.  Currently,
to see what a container object represented by an icon contains, a
user must open the object and then be presented with the composed
view.  What is provided by this disclosure is a mechanism for
displaying to the user from the icon itself information about what is
contained within.  Further the user is able to manipulate the
contained objects via interaction with the icon.

      The specialized icon used is exemplified by an icon containing
a picture of road-signs.  The motif of a collection of road-signs
imparts the notion of navigation and direction to the user.  Each
sign name represents one of the contained collection objects.  An
example of the type of collection this icon would well suit is the
IBM OS/2* 1.3 Desktop Manager.  It is a collection of groups, which
are, in turn, collections of programs located in various distinct
locations.

      By reserving certain areas of the collection icons for certain
types of action, the user is enabled to see all of what is contained
via scrolling.  For example, by clicking on the top of the icon, the
road-signs would scroll up, revealing additional navigation choices.
Display of the titles of the various contained groups can be
accompl...