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Method for Vacuum Depositing Aluminum on Thermoplastic Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110707D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kuczynski, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for treating the surfaces of thermoplastic substrates, particularly substrates composed of polycarbonate homopolymer, with a plasma generated using water vapor to enhance the adhesion of subsequently vacuum-deposited metal.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Method for Vacuum Depositing Aluminum on Thermoplastic Substrates

      Disclosed is a method for treating the surfaces of
thermoplastic substrates, particularly substrates composed of
polycarbonate homopolymer, with a plasma generated using water vapor
to enhance the adhesion of subsequently vacuum-deposited metal.

      In accordance with this method, thermoplastic parts are
pre-cleaned by a vapor-phase degreasing process and are then masked,
if necessary, racked, and transferred to a vacuum chamber.  The
chamber is evacuated below 0.0001 torr to remove residual solvent.
The chamber is next backfilled with water vapor using a heated liquid
source at 50 to 100 degrees C and a condensable vapor mass flow
controller.  The standard water vapor pressure is maintained at 200
mT (millitorr).  Water vapor plasma is generated between a grounded
electrode and an electrode to which RF (radio frequency) electrical
power is applied, typically using 50 watts of radio frequency power.
Substrates are subjected to this plasma for 5 to 30 minutes.
Following plasma exposure, the chamber is pumped down to less than
0.0001 torr, and aluminum is deposited on the substrates from the gas
phase.

      In a first example, polycarbonate (Lexan (trademark of the
General Electric Company) ML6000) plaques were treated for up to 30
minutes with water vapor plasma generated at 200 mT vapor pressure
with 50 watts RF power.  The plaques were then vacuum-metallized with
aluminum to a thic...