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Customer Feedback Display for Drive-Through Food Service Ordering and Comparable Merchandise Transactions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110775D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nussloch, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for improving the communications exchanged between customer (purchaser of product or service) and merchant (provider of product or service) in drive-through food and comparable merchandise ordering transactions. The solution calls for adding a visual display to the existing auditory communications typically found in drive-through ordering situations.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Customer Feedback Display for Drive-Through Food Service Ordering
and Comparable Merchandise Transactions

      Disclosed is a technique for improving the communications
exchanged between customer (purchaser of product or service) and
merchant (provider of product or service) in drive-through food and
comparable merchandise ordering transactions.  The solution calls for
adding a visual display to the existing auditory communications
typically found in drive-through ordering situations.

      Currently, drive-through food establishments display items
available for purchase on a large menu board.  The contents of the
menu board are generally fixed or static; they are changed manually
by the merchant as the items or their purchase price changes.
Typically, the menu board is located adjacent to an intercom or
microphone ordering station.  As the customer drives up to the
ordering station in a vehicle, the transaction between the customer
and the merchant takes place verbally only via the intercom or
microphone.

      The current situation described above is well known in
drive-through food restaurants and comparable merchandise
establishments.  The customer gives the order verbally to the
merchant.  The merchant confirms the order verbally with the customer
by repeating back the items ordered.  At times, the verbal
communication from the merchant to the customer may be inaudible or
difficult to understand.  As a result, incorrect orders for
merchandise or service may result.

      The proposed improvement consists of locating a visual dis...