Browse Prior Art Database

Managing a Text Document on a Non-Programmable Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110799D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 6 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Krosner, SP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article discloses a mechanism for allowing computer users of non-programmable terminals (NPTs) to have immediate visibility to the top portion of a document, while still allowing access to the entire document.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Managing a Text Document on a Non-Programmable Terminal

      This article discloses a mechanism for allowing computer users
of non-programmable terminals (NPTs) to have immediate visibility to
the top portion of a document, while still allowing access to the
entire document.

      In an object-oriented system, documents are objects that are
displayed on a panel.  Frequently, only a subset of the lines at the
top of a document are edited or viewed by the user.  However, access
to the entire document must be available.

      On intelligent workstations, controls are available to present
a portion of the document and allow the user to dynamically resize
and reposition his view of it.  However, on non-programmable
terminals (NPTs) the user is required to perform an action which
leads to a separate panel to display a document.  While this provides
access to the entire document, it forces the user who frequently
wishes to work with a part of the document to perform an extra
keystroke to access it; also, the user suffers a loss of context, by
being forced to leave the current panel.  What is needed on NPTs is a
facility which provides visibility to the top portion of the
document, while still allowing access to the entire document.

      Presenting parts of a document in rows of a panel gives
visibility to that portion of the document without having to view a
separate panel; however, only a part of the document can be viewed.
Presenting the entire document in the full-screen editor gives access
to the entire document; however, it occludes all the other panels
being displayed (particularly the one displaying other portions of
the parent object containing the document and other objects such as
lists or data entry fields).

      This invention creates a new presentation control which is
called a "textfield".  The textfield comp...