Browse Prior Art Database

Molecular Brush Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110840D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gerber, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The fabrication of molecular structures on a nanometer scale is a key step towards the production of logic, information storage, optical computing and even neural networks fabricated from organic and biological material. One method to fabricate arrays of molecules in specific locations on a surface is to use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or force microscopy (FM) as a lithographic tool [1]. It has recently been demonstrated that well-ordered monolayers of C sub 60 and other fullerenes can be deposited on a variety of metals and semiconductors [2]. In particular, gold is an excellent substrate material which is also used to prepare self-assembling molecular films [3].

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Molecular Brush Assembly

      The fabrication of molecular structures on a nanometer scale is
a key step towards the production of logic, information storage,
optical computing and even neural networks fabricated from organic
and biological material.  One method to fabricate arrays of molecules
in specific locations on a surface is to use scanning tunneling
microscopy (STM) or force microscopy (FM) as a lithographic tool [1].
It has recently been demonstrated that well-ordered monolayers of C
sub 60 and other fullerenes can be deposited on a variety of metals
and semiconductors [2].  In particular, gold is an excellent
substrate material which is also used to prepare self-assembling
molecular films [3].

      A new method for the fabrication of molecular self-assembling
materials in well-defined lithographic patterns involves the
following steps:  Firstly, a monolayer 1 of C sub 60 or other
fullerene is deposited onto a substrate 2, as schematically shown in
Figs. 1 and 2.  The layer 1 is then inspected using an STM or FM tip
3 (Fig. 3) and then immersed in a solution 4 containing
self-assembling molecules 5 which bond specifically to the substrate
2 but not to the fullerene overlayer 1 (Fig. 4).

      In order to write a pattern of molecular structures on the
surface, the STM or FM tip 3 is used to selectively push away
fullerene molecules of the monolayer 1 at specific locations on the
surface, as shown in Fig. 5.  This can be achieved by increasing th...