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Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Time-Dependent User Interface Modification

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110850D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 120K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Flores, D: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A methodology is described that allows for the automatic recall of a customized graphical end-user interface based on the time of day and to the configured skill level of the user. In a structured environment, where the demographics, computer literacy, physical limitations, and time usage, are predictable, users should be provided with their preferred desktop customization. Desktop customization should be time and user dependent, not system dependent.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Dynamic Time-Dependent User Interface Modification

      A methodology is described that allows for the automatic recall
of a customized graphical end-user interface based on the time of day
and to the configured skill level of the user.  In a structured
environment, where the demographics, computer literacy, physical
limitations, and time usage, are predictable, users should be
provided with their preferred desktop customization.  Desktop
customization should be time and user dependent, not system
dependent.

      Computers are often shared by more than one user.  For example,
a given computer may be used by adults in the mornings, physically,
visually and/or hearing impaired in the afternoons, and children in
the evenings.

      Personal computer interfaces provide icons, windows, pop-up and
pull-down menus, synthesized audible sounds, mouse controls, screen
colors, and other features to facilitate user interaction with
various applications running on a computer.  Desktop appearance and
organization is manually controlled by a user customizing menus,
screen contrast, brightness, and color, window sizes, mouse cursor
speed, etc., which are aesthetic to the user.

      Each type of user has a personal preference of screen
appearance, which varieties of applications are available (or should
be restricted), and which objects are to be placed on the desktop
area.  Most users organize and customize their desktop consistently
throughout use, no matter how many times the computer has been
powered off or rebooted.  Users recognize that consistent desktop
arrangement and customization facilitates efficient object
manipulation because the user can depend on where objects are, what
objects are available for use, and what they will look and sound
like.  OS/2* provides a save desktop option which allows desktop
arrangements to be saved so that next time the computer is used,
newly spawned icons will take the last place used.  This prior art
requires user interaction and only saves a desktop as a snapshot at
some point in time.

      Furthermore, the saved arrangement is system dependent, not
time nor user dependent.  It may be desirable for a computer system
to automatically adapt its graphical end-user interface, based on the
time of day, to the configured skill level of the user, without
forcing a user to save or retrieve these settings.

      The preferred embodiment enables configuration of the graphical
end-user interface to adapt to a particular type of user based on the
time of the day, as stored in the computer's system clock.  The user
does not have to manually enter data to validate the type of user he
is because the computer system anticipates and identifies changes in
the types of users (and their skill level) based on the time of day.
Subsequently, a type of user's desktop preferences will be re...