Browse Prior Art Database

Process for Improved Metallurgical Contact during LCVD Repair of Electrical Open Defects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110863D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baum, TH: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The laser-induced deposition of high purity tin is achieved via pyrolytic decomposition of dimethyl tin (IV) dihydride. This complex provides for pure tin film formation and possesses a high ambient vapor pressure. The ambient vapor pressure enables rapid rates for tin deposition. All of these properties make this complex an ideal candidate for the laser-induced deposition of tin layers. Since this complex has not been used for deposition of tin layers previously, the use of dimethyl tin (IV) dihydride is essential to the reported process. The ability to laser deposit tin layers via gas-phase processes may be used in concert with gold LCVD to repair electrical "open" defects in multi-chip packaging modules.

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Process for Improved Metallurgical Contact during LCVD Repair of
Electrical Open Defects

      The laser-induced deposition of high purity tin is achieved via
pyrolytic decomposition of dimethyl tin (IV)  dihydride.  This
complex  provides for pure tin film formation and possesses a high
ambient vapor pressure.  The ambient vapor pressure  enables  rapid
rates for tin deposition.   All of these properties make this complex
an ideal candidate  for the laser-induced deposition of tin layers.
Since this complex has not been used for deposition of tin layers
previously, the use of dimethyl tin (IV) dihydride  is  essential to
the  reported process.  The ability to laser deposit tin layers via
gas-phase processes may be used in  concert  with gold  LCVD to
repair electrical "open" defects in multi-chip packaging modules.

      The use of tin layers during the Laser Chemical Vapor
Deposition  (LCVD)  repair of multi-chip modules is advantageous for
improving the metallurgical contact between themetal circuit being
repaired and the laser-deposited metal repair.  The intermetallic
film formation between tin/nickel and tin/gold films is well known.
However, being  able  to exploit  alloy  formation  enables  one to
improve the electrical properties and metallurgical contact during
the laser-induced repair of defective thin-film circuits.  Thus the
formation of intermetallic species results in intimate contact and
improved adhesion of the repair metallurgy to the circuit being
repaired.

      Other dialkyl tin (IV) dihydrides can also be used to deposit
tin films with the same success, but the ambient vapor pressure of
the c...