Browse Prior Art Database

Triggering Events on a Graphical Stopwatch Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110871D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 6 page(s) / 103K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The workstation user needs to be able to trigger certain events from the Desktop, based upon time constraints. In addition, since the Desktop functions in a GUI (Graphical User Interface) environment, it would be helpful and practical to use a GUI control to trigger configuration and execution, but none exists.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Triggering Events on a Graphical Stopwatch Control

      The workstation user needs to be able to trigger certain events
from the Desktop, based upon time constraints.  In addition, since
the Desktop functions in a GUI (Graphical User Interface)
environment, it would be helpful and practical to use a GUI control
to trigger configuration and execution, but none exists.

      This system offers a new GUI control which resembles a
stopwatch, as shown in its initial configuration in Fig. 1.  Instead
of using revolving clock hands to denote the passage of time, the
Graphical StopWatch (GSW) moves objects from the desktop around the
perimeter of the clock.

      For example, suppose Bob is doing some performance testing on
program OFFICE.  He wants to configure the GSW to trigger certain
events at certain times during the test.  First he drags the OFFICE
icon to the top of the GSW at the "12 o'clock" position, as shown in
Fig. 2, so that OFFICE will be initiated as soon as the stopwatch
starts to run.  Then he drags the SEND icon to the outer perimeter of
the GSW at the "3 o'clock" position, as shown in Fig. 3.  This will
initiate the sending of mail exactly 45 seconds after OFFICE is
started.  Then Bob drags the POST icon to the inner perimeter of the
GSW at the "6 o'clock" position, as shown in  Fig. 4.  This will
cause calendar items to be posted exactly 5 minutes after OFFICE
starts.  In other words, placing objects outside the perimeter
schedules them to run within one minute, or one revolution of the
stop watch, while placing them inside the perimeter schedules them to
run within the next 10 minutes, or ten revolutions of the stopwatch.

When Bob double-clicks on the configured stopwatch, the foll...