Browse Prior Art Database

Method to Increase Wearability of Printed Circuit Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110894D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Healey, HJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a hardware implementation designed to increase the wearability of printed circuit cards, as used in electronic circuitry, through the use of a hard coating along the beveled edge of the card. The implementation is designed to reduce the force required for inserting and withdrawing the card from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) connectors thereby increase wearability of card edge tabs and mating surfaces.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method to Increase Wearability of Printed Circuit Cards

      Described is a hardware implementation designed to increase the
wearability of printed circuit cards, as used in electronic
circuitry, through the use of a hard coating along the beveled edge
of the card.  The implementation is designed to reduce the force
required for inserting and withdrawing the card from Printed Circuit
Board (PCB) connectors thereby increase wearability of card edge tabs
and mating surfaces.

      In prior art, the edges of printed circuit cards were not
treated or designed to cope with frequent insertions.  This could
cause damage to the connector system.  The concept described herein
improves on the printed circuit card design by applying a hard
coating along the beveled insertion edge of the card to prevent wear,
thereby increasing the life of the card.

      The Figure shows an isometric view of printed circuit card 10
with its male contact tabs 11 positioned ready for insertion into
female spring contacts 12 of card connector 13, which in turn is
soldered onto printed circuit board 14.  Printed circuit card 10
includes beveled edge 15 which is designed to aid in the insertion of
card 10 into contact springs 12 of card connector 13.  The beveling
operation tends to roughen the surface of the epoxy-glass laminate
(not shown) of card 10 and exposes epoxy slivers and glass fibers.
This roughened surface tends to cause excessive wear on female spring
contacts 12 of card connector 13.  Furthermore, the epoxy slivers and
glass fibers can break loose and be dragged into the contact area
between the male and female contacts, thereby impairing the
electrical co...