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Method of Ensuring the Correct Response to a Save Prompt

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110924D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Frequently a user will edit several files at the same time, often copying parts of some files to other files. As more and more files are edited at the same time, it becomes increasingly difficult for the user to keep track of his/her changes. For example, suppose Joe has been editing four source files for the last few minutes, files A, B, C, and D. He made many changes to files A, B, and C, copying parts of file D into each one. He also cleaned up a few minor errors in several of the files. He saves files A, B, and C, and then he selects to exit from file D without saving. However, he receives a save prompt, asking him if he wants to save the changes before quitting. At this point, Bill does not know whether to save the file or not.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Method of Ensuring the Correct Response to a Save Prompt

      Frequently a user will edit several files at the same time,
often copying parts of some files to other files.  As more and more
files are edited at the same time, it becomes increasingly difficult
for the user to keep track of his/her changes.  For example, suppose
Joe has been editing four source files for the last few minutes,
files A, B, C, and D.  He made many changes to files A, B, and C,
copying parts of file D into each one.  He also cleaned up a few
minor errors in several of the files.  He saves files A, B, and C,
and then he selects to exit from file D without saving.  However, he
receives a save prompt, asking him if he wants to save the changes
before quitting.  At this point, Bill does not know whether to save
the file or not.  He doesn't remember which changes he made to which
files, and he doesn't remember changing file D at all.  If he doesn't
save it, he risks losing a needed update he made.  If he does save
it, he risks saving an error made in file D while performing all the
moving and copying.  Had he inadvertently moved something out of file
D, instead of copying it?  A method is needed to allow the user to
make an intelligent decision as to whether or not changed files
should be saved.

      This system allows exposing all changed areas of an edited file
to the user, whenever changes are made to that line.  Then when the
user tries to quit, and a save prompt is displaye...