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Method for Notifying User a Scheduled Engagement is being Missed

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110933D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Electronic calendar systems are very helpful in managing a user's schedule. However, a user must consult the calendar in order to keep in touch with activities. Often a user consults a calendar only to find that the secretary or someone with authority to append to the user's calendar added an entry unknown to the user until after the start of such an event. Some users simply fail to look at their calendars in a timely manner. A method is needed for telling a user an event is being missed which the user should be attending.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 90% of the total text.

Method for Notifying User a Scheduled Engagement is being Missed

      Electronic calendar systems are very helpful in managing a
user's schedule.  However, a user must consult the calendar in order
to keep in touch with activities.  Often a user consults a calendar
only to find that the secretary or someone with authority to append
to the user's calendar added an entry unknown to the user until after
the start of such an event.  Some users simply fail to look at their
calendars in a timely manner.  A method is needed for telling a user
an event is being missed which the user should be attending.

      Provided is a method for automatically detecting the presence
of the user on the computer system and then immediately notifying the
user of a meeting scheduled at the time the user is detected at the
system.  For example, a user begins to use his computer during a time
when his calendar indicates the user should be at a meeting.  This
implementation deduces such a situation and prompts the user with the
calendar entry upon detecting user presence on the system.  Calendar
events which do not include meetings where the computer system is
located (i.e., user's office) are valid cases for interrupting the
user.  The user is prompted in such a way that whatever is being done
is interrupted and no other activity can be performed until the user
appropriately acknowledges seeing the calendar information.  Various
embodiments may warn the user when a specified lead t...