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Functional Test Case Identification in an Object-Oriented Environment using Matrix Progression Techniques

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110935D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 117K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carter, CM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a methodology for functionally testing an object-oriented designed and programmed software system using a matrix progression technique. When testing an object-oriented system wherein requirements are defined as end-user functions, actions need to be mapped to specifications functions. Object-oriented design and programming dictates that for each identified object, discrete actions need to be defined. For large software systems this translates to thousands of actions or procedures. Therefore, one function can traverse hundreds of actions. To insure complete validation of the software during test requires the use of a matrix progression technique.

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Functional Test Case Identification in an Object-Oriented Environment
using Matrix Progression Techniques

      Disclosed is a methodology for functionally testing an
object-oriented designed and programmed software system using a
matrix progression technique.  When testing an object-oriented system
wherein requirements are defined as end-user functions, actions need
to be mapped to specifications functions.   Object-oriented design
and programming dictates that for each identified object, discrete
actions need to be defined.  For large software systems this
translates to thousands of actions or procedures.  Therefore, one
function can traverse hundreds of actions.  To insure complete
validation of the software during test requires the use of a matrix
progression technique.

      The matrix progression technique involves the development and
refinement of a test matrix for each phase of the software
development cycle.  This includes matrix development for each
application of a multi-application system, as shown in the Figure.

To thoroughly test the multi-application system, composite matrices
are developed.  The composite matrices are created to track and
resolve all external interfaces to other applications and the
application methods invoked.

      The matrix progression technique involves the following steps,
including marking the row and column intersection as appropriate:

1.  During the specification phase, development of a matrix that maps
    functions to sub-functions or objects from the product
    specifications.

2.  During high level design, redefine the sub-functions into high
    level actions and map these to the functions identified in the
    specification matrix.  Use the functions as the row elements and
    the column as a two-level column that includes, first, the
    sub-functions and then the second level of the column includes
    each action related to the sub-function.

3.  Refine the matrix during low level design to map the functions
    (rows) against the actions and associated methods involved when
    the function is invoked.  The column is again a two-level column
    that includes, first, the action and then each method invoked as
    a result of the action.  During the development of this matrix
    the order in which each method is invoked is also noted by number
    in the matrix itself.

4.  Now to create the test matrix, use the functions as the row
    elements and the test case number as the column; using
    information solely from the matrix developed in step 3.

    At this stage, testers are able to identify a set of test cases
    to fully test each function.  These test cases are mapped against
    the methods they each traverse.  This information serves as input
    to the test case matrix as stated above and provides feedback to
    the testers with regard to completeness of planned testing.

5.  Lastly, a cod...