Browse Prior Art Database

Contextual Session Command Guidance Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110936D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Salahshour, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Users may enter commands into a wrong desktop window or operating session. For example, a user accidentally enters a VM command within an OS/2* operating session. A more explicit example is a user who typically uploads files to the host using a DOS/OS/2 application. This user may type ALMCOPY c:(myfile.* h:(* * a1 and then wish to perform VM filelist command (flist * *) to view the files that were uploaded. If the user forgot to change focus to the VM application, the DOS/OS/2 application will prompt the user with a "Bad file name or program not found 'message'". Users desire mechanisms by which a correct command, entered advertently or inadvertently into an incorrect window/session, can be appropriately located to a window/session familiar with the command and for which focus may be attained for that window/session.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Contextual Session Command Guidance Mechanism

      Users may enter commands into a wrong desktop window or
operating session.  For example, a user accidentally enters a VM
command within an OS/2* operating session.  A more explicit example
is a user who typically uploads files to the host using a DOS/OS/2
application.  This user may type ALMCOPY c:(myfile.* h:(* * a1 and
then wish to perform VM filelist command (flist * *) to view the
files that were uploaded.  If the user forgot to change focus to the
VM application, the DOS/OS/2 application will prompt the user with a
"Bad file name or program not found 'message'".  Users desire
mechanisms by which a correct command, entered advertently or
inadvertently into an incorrect window/session, can be appropriately
located to a window/session familiar with the command and for which
focus may be attained for that window/session.  This problem should
not be confused with prior methods that attempt to solve the problem
of a user misspelling a command word within a single session.

      This article describes a method by which operating commands are
associated within the context of differing windowing sessions.  More
specifically, a mechanism, upon detecting an unknown command within
one windowing session, can guide a user to another window session
which is cognizant of the command.

Essential Elements - A Registry Service allows users to enter the
syntax necessary for command recognition.  This essentially allows
keystrokes and other user input to be defined for command operations.
For example, keystrokes followed by an ENTER key at a DOS prompt can
be considered as a command.  Optionally, users may directly define
known commands for specified windows.

Command Association Monitor - This element monitors commands within
an individual window and constructs an Association Usage Table of the
commands.  This element functions similar to DOS and OS/2 command
line buffers.  More importantly, this element associates the commands
to t...