Browse Prior Art Database

Correlation of Failure Notifications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110993D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martin, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Environment - In telecommunications networks, resources are connected together to facilitate the transmission of information (data, voice, image). The connections between these resources may be viewed from several perspectives. From the global perspective, a user of the telecommunications network may be connected to another user or to information. From the physical perspective, a portion of this connection may be a terminal connected to a cable that is connected to a port on a telecommunications device.

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Correlation of Failure Notifications

      Environment - In telecommunications networks, resources are
connected together to facilitate the transmission of information
(data, voice, image).  The connections between these resources may be
viewed from several perspectives.  From the global perspective, a
user of the telecommunications network may be connected to another
user or to information.  From the physical perspective, a portion of
this connection may be a terminal connected to a cable that is
connected to a port on a telecommunications device.

      Throughout the various perspectives exist very complex,
multi-layered relationships among the resources that compose the
telecommunications network.  A resource named A, for example, may
appear to support three connections to a resource named B, as
depicted in Fig. 1.  In reality, resource A is composed of three
sub-resources (designated A1, A2, and A3).  Each sub-resource has a
corresponding sub-resource in resource B (designated B1, B2, and B3).
Each connection between resource A and resource B may be named by the
sub-resources that are connected, i.e., A1-B1, A2-B2, and A3-B3.

      A name may be assigned to a connection.  This name may be a
concatenation of the connected resources, as in A1-B1 and A2-B2, or a
name negotiated between the connected resources, such as PATH 1 and
PATH 2, as shown in Fig. 2.  A connection, once identified, may be
treated as a resource.  The resource (PATH 1) may also be composed of
sub-resources, such as D, E, and F, where resource D represents a
connection between A1 and E and resource F represents a connection
between E and B1.  Likewise, PATH 2 may be composed of sub-resources
G, E, and H.

      Multiple connections may share a resource, such as E, as shown
in Fig. 3.  The shared resource is actually composed of sub-resources
E1, E2, E3, E4, and E5, as shown in Fig. 4.  A dynamic connection
exists between resource E1 and E4 that represents PATH 1's use of
resource E.  Between E2 and E5 is the dynamic connection that
supports PATH 2.  Resource E, having knowledge of its sub-resources,
understands the dynamic connections E1-E3-E4 and E2-E3-E5.

      Resources may be recursively defined as collections of
sub-resources, until the telecommunications network is fully defined.
Any collection of resources may be managed together.  A Service Point
represents the appearance of this collection of resources to the
network manager.  The collection of resources managed by a Service
Point need not be physically contiguous.  Service Point 1, for
example, manages resources D, E, E1, E2, E3, E4, E5, F, G, and H.
Service Point 2 manages resources A, A1, A2, A3, B, B1, B2, and B3.
Service Point 2 also treats the connection between A1 and B1 as a
resource identified as PATH 1 and between A2 and B2 as resource PATH
2.  Fig. 5 depicts the relationship between the Service Points and
these resources.

      When a resource fails in a n...