Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Determining which Broadcast Signals to Receive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110996D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Current art allows television receivers to receive many different broadcast signals. Some televisions have channels 0 through 99, and some can have over 100 channels. There are currently over 100 different cable signals which can be received, and there will be many more in the near future. Current art also allows for several televisions to share the same cable connection. The users of shared televisions or shared cables need an equitable method for determining which cable signals will be received.

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Method of Determining which Broadcast Signals to Receive

      Current art allows television receivers to receive many
different broadcast signals.  Some televisions have channels 0
through 99, and some can have over 100 channels.  There are currently
over 100 different cable signals which can be received, and there
will be many more in the near future.  Current art also allows for
several televisions to share the same cable connection.  The users of
shared televisions or shared cables need an equitable method for
determining which cable signals will be received.

      This system provides a method by which users of shared
televisions or shared cable connections can determine which signals
will be received.  This is accomplished through the use of a Signal
Determination (SD) box installed on the incoming cable line.  The SD
box can route any of the incoming cable signals into the destination
televisions.  The determination of which signals to route is made by
allowing the television users to vote on the signals they would like
to receive.  The votes are tallied at the SD box, and the X signals
receiving the most votes will be routed to the destination
televisions, where X is the number of channels available on the
televisions.

      For example, suppose the incoming cable connection, with 200
available signals, is shared by 30 television sets.  Suppose also
that 25 of these televisions are equipped with 100 channels, and 5 of
them are equipped with 15...