Browse Prior Art Database

Electroless Seeding of Polyimides by Plasma Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111004D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that allows for selective surface modification to provide activation sites for electroless plating by modifying the surface conductivity via ion implantation of the surface of a polymer by ion implantation from a plasma discharge. The technique allows for selectivity through a mask, i.e., silylated photo-resist or other organic photo/laser imagable masks and or metal masks. The surface treatment is a function of the type, energy, and dose of the incoming ions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Electroless Seeding of Polyimides by Plasma Implantation

      Disclosed is a technique that allows for selective surface
modification to provide activation sites for electroless plating by
modifying the surface conductivity  via ion implantation of the
surface of a polymer by ion implantation from a plasma discharge.
The technique allows for selectivity through a mask, i.e., silylated
photo-resist or other organic photo/laser imagable masks and or metal
masks.  The surface treatment is a function of the type, energy, and
dose of the incoming ions.

      Considerable interest has been focussed on multi level high
performance electronic packaging utilizing polymeric materials and
metal deposition, which are key processing technologies for the
production of integrated circuits.  One technique for forming metal
interconnects and metallizing dielectrics, such as polyimide, is
electro-less plating, which is a low cost, and simple manufacturing
process.  Key to the electro-less plating is surface modification  of
the polyimide to allow for selective plating, using seeding or
selective catalysts, such that metal deposition, e.g., copper, takes
place on from the bottom up on lines, in channels, and in vias.

      Reactive Ion Etch technology can be used to direct a flux of
ions from a plasma normal to a surface.  Normal plasmas can be run so
that the incoming ions impinge on the surface with energies from
10-100 volts.  With special techniques, a high voltage p...