Browse Prior Art Database

Hybrid Digital-Analog Audio and Video for Fast Access and Low Cost Media Segments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111026D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cofino, TA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an architecture for multi-media (audio + video) applications which combines the benefits of digitized and analog media segments for use in applications. Analog media discs are cheap and allow the end user to easily change the set of segments (by changing the disc), however switching between segments on a disc entails a long wait time to access a segment. Digital media (such as DVI and digitized audio) allows for fast access time but requires large amounts of hard disc space (and for video, expensive digitizing). The approach described here allows applications to use analog media while enjoying the fast access time of digital media segments, without having to digitize the whole segment.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Hybrid Digital-Analog Audio and Video for Fast Access and Low Cost
Media Segments

      Disclosed is an architecture for multi-media (audio + video)
applications which combines the benefits of digitized and analog
media segments for use in applications.  Analog media discs are cheap
and allow the end user to easily change the set of segments (by
changing the disc), however switching between segments on a disc
entails a long wait time to access a segment.  Digital media (such as
DVI and digitized audio) allows for fast access time but requires
large amounts of hard disc space (and for video, expensive
digitizing).  The approach described here allows applications to use
analog media while enjoying the fast access time of digital media
segments, without having to digitize the whole segment.

      The problem relates to multi-media applications which allow the
user to access multiple segments of media stored on a single media
disc.  There are two ways to allow an application to access media:

1.  Via a direct access analog media player - e.g., a video disc
    player.

2.  Via digital media segments contained on hard disc.

      Each of the above solutions has its pluses and minuses.  Analog
media is cheap and allows the end user to easily change discs.
However the time to access a segment can be very large (on the order
of seconds for a laser disc player).  The seek time can be reduced by
allowing the end-user to access segments in only a specific order -
however, this constraint is clearly unacceptable for many
applications.  Digital media has very fast access time for a segment
- however, the entire catalog of required segments must be digitized
(which can be very expensive) and then stored on a hard disc
(requires large amount of storage) and the end user would have a hard
time changing the set of segments on his own.

  ...