Browse Prior Art Database

VCOS Lid Remove Fixture for Furnace Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111051D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, HL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device for removing solder-sealed lids from electronic packages with challenging profiles or shapes, using a belt furnace type of operation.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

VCOS Lid Remove Fixture for Furnace Processing

      Disclosed is a device for removing solder-sealed lids from
electronic packages with challenging profiles or shapes, using a belt
furnace type of operation.

      During lid remove, the main step is to reflow the solder band
between the lid and the carrier below.  Traditionally, this process
has been done using a dedicated workstation/tool where the module is
placed upon a "hot plate" to be heated up and an overhead heated
device with vacuum capability is positioned over the lid, attached,
and used to pull off the lid after the solder reflows.  There are
three main drawbacks to this technique.  First, the atmospheric and
thermal (heat) conditions must be maintained within a narrow band of
acceptable levels for the process to transpire acceptably.  Second,
it is a very manually intensive and slow process, whereby an operator
must remain at the tool for up to several minutes per lid removal
while the solder reflows.  Third, the physical parameters of some
packages make them challenging to work with due to their densely
packaged layouts.

      By developing a fixture that would pull off the lids using the
heat generated in a standard belt furnace to reflow the solder, labor
savings of up to 90% were attained while simultaneously improving the
performance and maintainability of the process.  The labor savings
are because the operator can load any number of fixtures onto the
belt and perform other tasks while they are in the furnace.  The
process performance is improved because the furnace provides a
nitrogen environment and thermal profile which are highly repeatable
for each module, a problem with stand-alone tools.

      As can be seen in the Figure, there are ten main parts to the
new fixture.  Starting at the bottom, the carrier base, 1, supports
the module in a locator nest, 2, on its top surface and has two
support pillar...