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Browse Prior Art Database

High-Density Immersion Cooled-Electronic Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111152D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Green, DC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A high package density is achieved by the direct mounting of bare, unpackaged chips on two sides of a substrate or Printed Wiring Board (PWB), and mounting two such PWBs in an electronic module assembly. The package density achieved is dependent on the ability to remove heat from the electronics. The problem of removing heat is more difficult when chips are mounted on both sides of the PWB because the separation between PWBs is small. To both minimize dimensional problems and insure that heat transfer is not degraded by vibration requires that the thermal path from the chip be compliant. The thermal path must also be removable to permit chip replacement. Immersion cooling provides this solution. Although air also is compliant, impinging air on components is not permitted for most military avionic systems.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

High-Density Immersion Cooled-Electronic Module

      A high package density is achieved by the direct mounting of
bare, unpackaged chips on two sides of a substrate or Printed Wiring
Board (PWB), and mounting two such PWBs in an electronic module
assembly.  The package density achieved is dependent on the ability
to remove heat from the electronics.  The problem of removing heat is
more difficult when chips are mounted on both sides of the PWB
because the separation between PWBs is small.  To both minimize
dimensional problems and insure that heat transfer is not degraded by
vibration requires that the thermal path from the chip be compliant.
The thermal path must also be removable to permit chip replacement.
Immersion cooling provides this solution.  Although air also is
compliant, impinging air on components is not permitted for most
military avionic systems.

      The Figure depicts a Format E, Standard Military Module (SEM)
that doubles the package density and can be mounted on 0.600 inch
centers.  Two PWBs (1) with electronics on both surfaces are immersed
in a fluorocarbon liquid.  With the exception of the center frame 2
that is an integral part of the structure, the construction is
similar to that described by disclosures [*].  Both PWBs 1 are
positioned by slots on three edges of the enclosure 3.

      The module consists of an enclosure 3, a connector 4 and shell
5.  A silicone compound (RTV) is used to form a removable seal 6
between the sh...