Browse Prior Art Database

Redundant Power Distribution System with Full Concurrent Maintenance

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111182D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cutts, SJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an economic method to provide continuous power to electronic boxes in an installation yet still be able to remove parts of the supply system during maintenance without supply interruption. It solves the problem of powering in an R+1 redundant 'tailed' distribution system where R power modules each with N outputs drive up to P subassemblies using pairs of independent busses, so as to allow cables and power modules to be removed without causing any subassembly to power down. Existing solutions require each box to have 100% redundant supplies, which is costly.

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Redundant Power Distribution System with Full Concurrent Maintenance

      Disclosed is an economic method to provide continuous power to
electronic boxes in an installation yet still be able to remove parts
of the supply system during maintenance without supply interruption.
It solves the problem of powering in an R+1 redundant 'tailed'
distribution system where R power modules each with N outputs drive
up to P subassemblies using pairs of independent busses, so as to
allow cables and power modules to be removed without causing any
subassembly to power down.   Existing solutions require each box to
have 100% redundant supplies, which is costly.

      Fig. 1 shows diagrammatically the solution to this problem as
it applies to three power supplies each with two outputs connected to
dual busses that power three subassemblies.

Four aspects of this configuration contribute to the 100% concurrent
maintenance attribute:

1.  Separate cabling connections between the power supply ports and
    the subassemblies allow cable sections to be removed but leaves
    the subsystem powered by an alternative path.

2.  Selection of two ports per PSU and one PSU per subassembly (in
    this instance) allows a single power module to be removed without
    loss of power to the subassemblies.   Fig. 1 shows this to apply
    for three PSUs, with 2 ports and three subassemblies.

3.  Use of 'down slope' or current sharing load balancing methods to
    allow the Pow...