Browse Prior Art Database

Tabular Input User Interface Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111215D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Elder, DB: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for displaying and editing a series of related data objects on a non-programmable terminal. The objects are represented in tabular form where each row contains all of the attributes for an object. The user can type over one or more attributes in one or more objects and change them in the underlying object. The user can also use this control to select one object and view it in more detail by presenting it in a list-like format.

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Tabular Input User Interface Control

      Disclosed is a method for displaying and editing a series of
related data objects on a non-programmable terminal.  The objects are
represented in tabular form where each row contains all of the
attributes for an object.  The user can type over one or more
attributes in one or more objects and change them in the underlying
object.  The user can also use this control to select one object and
view it in more detail by presenting it in a list-like format.

      Tabular change allows users to interact with a list of objects
(rows) as though the objects were in a table; that is, the user can
change the attributes of an object by typing data into row or column
cells of a list panel.

      If this were illustrated in a Figure, the concept would be as
follows.  Each row in the main panel (large panel) actually would
represent an object detail panel (small panels).  When the user typed
over the information on the main panel, it would change the values in
the object.  If the user were to look at the object detail panels,
this change would also be seen.

      Scrolling through the main panel is the same as choosing
multiple object detail panels in sequence.  Scrolling through the
main panel, however, provides superior usability and performance.

      A special command in the selection field will cause the
individual row on the main panel to be opened as a vertical object
detail panel.