Browse Prior Art Database

Scrolling Over Data of Indeterminate Size (Idefinite Scroll Bar)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111236D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kehn, DB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Today's computer users expect immediate results. However, in some cases, it is difficult to display data to a user until all the data is retrieved. In other cases, the size of the scrollable area is so large traditional scrolling mechanisms are inefficient.

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Scrolling Over Data of Indeterminate Size (Idefinite Scroll Bar)

      Today's computer users expect immediate results.  However, in
some cases, it is difficult to display data to a user until all the
data is retrieved.  In other cases, the size of the scrollable area
is so large traditional scrolling mechanisms are inefficient.

      When large amounts of data need to be displayed, many
applications require the user to wait until all the data is
retrieved.  For example, a search that has many matches will
typically have all the entries retrieved, or at least the number of
matches, before the list is presented.

      Instead of requiring the user to wait for long periods while
large amounts of data are retrieved, some user interface designers
choose to impose an arbitrary "reasonable" limit on the number of
matches allowed.  If that limit is reached, a message is displayed,
and the user must enter more specific search criteria.

      Computer users expect immediate results.  But aspects of the
user interface discourage the display of results before all data is
retrieved.  For example, traditional scroll bars require that the
size (or count) of the area (or rows) be known in order to set the
position of the thumb (AKA, "elevator").

      Multitasking computer environments allow the programmer to
divide a user request into several tasks which can be performed
concurrently.  For example, a long database search might be divided
into two tasks: one to retrieve the matching data, and a second task
to handle the user interaction.  But ...