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Method for Modifying Answer Machine Outgoing Messages with Discreet Messeges

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111241D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Provided is a method for allowing a user to specify a discreet message option when recording an outgoing message (OGM). The user records a message and then has the ability to convert the message into a synthesized voice. Fine tuning functionality may be additionally provided.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

Method for Modifying Answer Machine Outgoing Messages with Discreet
Messeges

      Provided is a method for allowing a user to specify a discreet
message option when recording an outgoing message (OGM).  The user
records a message and then has the ability to convert the message
into a synthesized voice.  Fine tuning functionality may be
additionally provided.

      Current answer machines allow recording outgoing messages for
play to callers.  Often times a user does not wish to have his voice
in the outgoing message.  A method is needed for conveniently
recording outgoing messages which can be converted into a discreet
form.

      Provided is a method for allowing a user to specify a discreet
message option when recording an outgoing message (OGM).  The user
may record the message local to the answer machine or remote from a
telephone.  Upon entering an OGM record mode, the user voices the
desired message.  When the message desired is completed, the user may
specify to modify the message into a discreet message or play the
original message for review.  If the user chooses to create a
discreet message, the message is converted word by word into a string
of words.  In fact, the user may have intentionally recorded a
message in the third person (e.g., "He is not here" instead of "I am
not here").  An annotation program reads the words and plays the
results back to the user, accenting word syllables just as the user
did in the original message.  If the...