Browse Prior Art Database

Method and Apparatus for Multi-Media Phone Number Memory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111278D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Provided is a means of aiding the phone user with both system-generated and user-generated ways of remembering phone numbers, in a multi-media environment.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 45% of the total text.

Method and Apparatus for Multi-Media Phone Number Memory

      Provided is a means of aiding the phone user with both
system-generated and user-generated ways of remembering phone
numbers, in a multi-media environment.

      Frequently, a telephone user looks up a phone number in an
address book or telephone book, dials the number, and then forgets
the number without recording it for future use.  The next day, he
discovers he needs the same number again, but he has to do another
search for it.  There is nothing available to assist the user in
remembering the number.

      Provided is a method of solving the problem of forgetting phone
numbers.  It uses syntax generated by either the user or the system,
in order to give the user easy ways to remember phone numbers.  This
invention is organized as follows:

1.  System-Generated Syntax (SGS) Function

2.  User-Generated Syntax (UGS) Function

    o   Memory Create Mode (MCM)

    o   Memory Service Mode (MSM)

    o   System-Generated Syntax Function

      When the System-Generated Syntax (SGS) Function is activated,
the system initiates a dictionary search whenever the user dials a
number.  While the call is being connected and the user is waiting,
the system searches the dictionary for a word or combination of words
equating the alphabetic code as defined on the number keys of any
telephone; i.e., the 2 key can be equated with either an "A", a "B",
or a "C"; the 3 key can be equated with either a "D", and "E", or an
"F"; etc.  This technique is frequently used by advertisers to assist
prospective clients in remembering their phone numbers.  This can
best be illustrated with the following example.

      After locating the correct phone number, the user dials
"266-5568".  As the call is being placed, the system conducts a
dictionary search for easily remembered words whose letters
correspond to the numbers 2-6-6-5-5-6-8.  The logic of the search is
as follows:

1.  Since the first number "2" corresponds to either "A", "B", or
    "C", conduct a search for 7-letter words beginning with A, B, or
    C, according to this pattern:  ABC-MNO-MNO-JKL-JKL-MNO-TUV.  If
    matches are found, voice them to the user while the phone is
    still ringing.

2.  Repeat step 1 trying 6-letter words plus a number.

3.  Repeat step 1 trying 5-letter words and 2-letter words.

4.  Repeat step 1 trying 4-letter words and 3-letter words.

5.  Repeat step 1 trying 3-letter words and 4-letter words.

6.  Repeat step 1 trying 2-letter words and 5-letter words.

7.  Repeat step 1 trying a number plus 6-letter words.

      Since a match is found in step 4, the user then hears the voice
message "BOOK LOT", which will help the user to remember the phone
number for next time.

     Here are some more examples:

          266-5668 = BOOK LOT
             243-2836 = 2 HEAVEN
             427-8396 = HARVEY 6
        (878)...