Browse Prior Art Database

Displaying OS/2 Message Numbers in Messages Ported from UNIX Environments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111288D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feigel, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for displaying message numbers with messages ported from a UNIX* to OS/2** environment. A major goal of porting across environments is to avoid making major logic changes to the code. OS/2 and UNIX have different methods for displaying messages and helps. If the above goal is to be met, it is desirable to continue to use the UNIX facility to display messages. It is also necessary to use the help system to maintain consistency for the user of OS/2 applications.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Displaying OS/2 Message Numbers in Messages Ported from UNIX Environments

      Disclosed is a method for displaying message numbers with
messages ported from a UNIX* to OS/2** environment.  A major goal of
porting across environments is to avoid making major logic changes to
the code.  OS/2 and UNIX have different methods for displaying
messages and helps.  If the above goal is to be met, it is desirable
to continue to use the UNIX facility to display messages.  It is also
necessary to use the help system to maintain consistency for the user
of OS/2 applications.

      The message source files used in the UNIX environment contain a
message number followed by text.  The message numbers are used by
programs to indicate the desired messages to be displayed, but the
message numbers themselves are not displayed.  It is not only helpful
to the user to see the message number, but it is also necessary to
know the number in order to use the OS/2 help facility.

      The solution is to incorporate OS/2 message numbers within the
text of the message in the source file.  The UNIX message number is
not deleted.  This allows the programs to reference messages as
usual, but when displayed, the OS/2 message number appears in the
text.  The displayed message number is then used to access help and
publications.

      Example 1 is a typical UNIX message source file containing a
message number followed by the text to be displayed.  Example 2 shows
how the messages...