Browse Prior Art Database

Windowless Icon Grouping

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111289D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henshaw, SF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

To organize icons into a group, a user is provided a means for creating hooks in the white space of windows, or on the desktop, and associating an icon or a group of icons with these hooks. For example, assume that the desktop is organized to present a messy desktop. A user can then go to a hook template, and create a new hook. Once created, the user can place it anywhere on the desktop, or on the white space within any window. Once created, the user can open up the settings for the hook just as they would for any other object (double click on it, use its pop-up menu, or a pull-down menu). To associate a single icon with that hook, the user would merely pick up that icon and drop it on the hook. This will create an association of that icon and it's presentation with the hook.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 62% of the total text.

Windowless Icon Grouping

      To organize icons into a group, a user is provided a means for
creating hooks in the white space of windows, or on the desktop, and
associating an icon or a group of icons with these hooks.  For
example, assume that the desktop is organized to present a messy
desktop.  A user can then go to a hook template, and create a new
hook.  Once created, the user can place it anywhere on the desktop,
or on the white space within any window.  Once created, the user can
open up the settings for the hook just as they would for any other
object (double click on it, use its pop-up menu, or a pull-down
menu).  To associate a single icon with that hook, the user would
merely pick up that icon and drop it on the hook.  This will create
an association of that icon and it's presentation with the hook.  In
the same manner, a user can pick up a set of selected objects, and
place these on a hook.  The latter will enable a user to have groups
of objects "hooked together" on the desktop, maintaining their
relative positioning as defined when they were hooked together.

      This notion provides for any number of objects to be placed at
a specific locations on the desktop, and all others to either be
messily placed, or ordered according to some criteria.  This provides
the user with both messy and ordered containers, all at the same
time.  This can, of course, be augmented with views of totally
free-placed objects, and totally ordered objects, in ord...