Browse Prior Art Database

Freeing EXCI Users from Defining Connections for Each Batch User

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111358D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reddiough, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an ability to simultaneously have a pool of non-CICS to CICS connections for use by any non-CICS program and any number of dedicated connections each of which can only be used by a specified non-CICS program.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Freeing EXCI Users from Defining Connections for Each Batch User

      Disclosed is an ability to simultaneously have a pool of
non-CICS to CICS connections for use by any non-CICS program and any
number of dedicated connections each of which can only be used by a
specified non-CICS program.

      Solved is the need to accommodate two types of non-CICS program
wishing to invoke CICS programs, e.g., a large volume of 'one-off'
non-CICS programs requiring infrequent connections for unpredictable
short time periods and a smaller number of non-CICS subsystems or
large vendor products requiring many, frequent, long-time dedicated
connections.

      The External CICS Interface (EXCI, or Batch DPL as it is better
known) provides an interface to CICS application programs from a
Batch environment, be it a pure MVS batch program, or TSO, IMS DC,
etc.  The first API call the batch application must issue is one
called the Initialize User call which registers the batch program as
a user of the EXCI facility.   On the API call, the user passes a
name that it wishes to be known by, in order that many users can use
the facility without interference.   Later, when the batch program
allocates and opens pipes to the targeted CICS system, it does so by
using a connection defined on that CICS system with the connection
name corresponding to this batch name.

      It was soon realized that, in an environment with many
different batch callers, a CICS connection would have to be defined
for each, making the systems management over complex.  In addition,
connections would have to be added and removed every time a new batch
application came into being or was removed from the system.   This
overall situation is difficult to manage, and unacceptable to many
users.

      In designing a solution to this problem, it was undesirable t...