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Reorganizing Menu Hierarchy to Best Fit the Individual User

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111391D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blades, JA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A system can maintain a data base of what each user does. Then, when there is a good probability that a user wants to perform a certain function from a sub-menu, the system adds that function to the current menu.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Reorganizing Menu Hierarchy to Best Fit the Individual User

      A system can maintain a data base of what each user does.
Then, when there is a good probability that a user wants to perform a
certain function from a sub-menu, the system adds that function to
the current menu.

      An application or an operating system can maintain a data base
of what each user does.  Then, when there is a good probability that
a user wants to perform a certain function from a sub-menu, the
system adds that function to the current menu.  This makes the
sub-menu function available to the user sooner.  Four examples will
now be discussed.

      Example 1:  A user may call a voice response unit (VRU)
application.  In almost all cases, the user may wish to perform the
same task.  This could involve going through many menus/sub-menus, to
get the task accomplished.  The VRU system could recognize the user
(from telephone number, PIN number, or speech recognition
technology), and determine that the user typically does a certain
task.  The system could then add that sub-menu function to an earlier
menu.  Note that the function should still exist on the original
sub-menu.

      Example 2: A multimedia kiosk may present a menu to a user by
playing a sequence of video clips as prompts.  Selecting some prompts
leads the user to sub-menus consisting of more video clips.  The
kiosk would store the usage patterns of particular users when
identified via a PIN, magnetic card, smart card, signature
recognition, speech recognition, or some other means.  The kiosk
would know when a user is likely to select a video clip in a sub-menu
before that sub-menu is reached.  The kiosk could include that clip
in an earlier video menu.

      Example 3: Many operating systems present pull-down lists or
pop-up lists.  Some choices in these lists may have a cascading lis...