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Method for Manager-Agent Accounting Data Interpretation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111428D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 126K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Temoshenko, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method for Manager-Agent accounting data interpretation is disclosed. The agent creates and stores the data-objects in text/character format. Standard bulk data transfer programs, e.g., FTP, will automatically convert the Agent's native text strings to the Manager's native text strings.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Manager-Agent Accounting Data Interpretation

      A method for Manager-Agent accounting data interpretation is
disclosed.  The agent creates and stores the data-objects in
text/character format.  Standard bulk data transfer programs, e.g.,
FTP, will automatically convert the Agent's native text strings to
the Manager's native text strings.

      One of the key network management functions for any routing
protocol is accounting.  Customers have long required routing
protocols to provide accounting data.  This accounting data is
typically then used as input into the customer's billing,
performance, capacity planning and/or problem determination
applications.

      Accounting data for a specific protocol resource, e.g.,
session, consists of a group of data-objects.  This group of
data-objects can be viewed as an accounting record.  Typically, this
group of data-objects will consist of names (character strings) and
numbers (counters, integers, gauges).

      Using a standard network manager protocol (SNMP, CMIP) to
retrieve the accounting data from the Agent, the Manager will not
experience difficulties interpreting the Agent-created data.  These
interactive protocols specify format and interpretation rules.

      The Manager may choose to retrieve the accounting data from the
Agent through bulk data transfer, e.g., file transfer, for a variety
of cost and performance reasons.  In this case, the Manager must be
very aware of the Agent's internal representation of the accounting
data.

      The Manager's interpretation of the internal representation of
accounting data created by an Agent may be incorrect due to their
underlying hardware platforms.  This situation exists when the
Manager retrieves the accounting data through bulk data transfer,
e.g., file transfer.

      The internal representation of names and numbers is dependent
upon the hardware platform of the Agent and their interpretation is
dependent upon the hardware platform of the Manager.  For example,
depending on the hardware platform, a name (character string) may be
represented in ASCII or EBCDIC, and may consist of 1-n number of
characters.  Likewise, numbers may be represented as signed or
unsigned numbers, and may consist of 2-8 bytes in either
left-to-right order or right-to-left order.

      To address the problem of consistent interpretation of
accounting data between an A...