Browse Prior Art Database

Learning about Intercell Interference Topology in a Wireless Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111440D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Natarajan, KS: AUTHOR

Abstract

A wireless data or voice communications network of base stations and mobile devices benefits from a choice of its operating parameters that minimizes intercell interference. Disclosed is a mechanism that learns the network topology without human intervention, that topology being valuable in the choice of an interference reduction strategy.

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Learning about Intercell Interference Topology in a Wireless Network

      A wireless data or voice communications network of base
stations and mobile devices benefits from a choice of its operating
parameters that minimizes intercell interference.  Disclosed is a
mechanism that learns the network topology without human
intervention, that topology being valuable in the choice of an
interference reduction strategy.

      In a wireless communications system, in which base stations are
employed to provide coverage to desired areas, the location of those
base stations may be difficult to determine initially and may change
during the lifetime of the system.  Their coverage areas may also
change.  Some systems require complete coverage.  This implies that
the coverage areas of adjacent base stations may overlap to some
extent.  In the region of overlap, mobile units will receive signals
from both base stations, and if these signals are not separated in
time, frequency, or coding, interference will result.  It is the job
of a distinguished station in the network, here called the "network
manager,"  to assign time, frequencies, or codes to potentially
interfering base stations so as to minimize that interference.

      But expressing the adjacency between base stations may be
difficult or even impossible to do manually.  First of all, it is
desirable to automate that task, because people make mistakes and
don't want to have to express such arcane network characteristics as
"adjacency." But with wireless networks, adjacency may be very hard
to determine: it is well-known in radio networks, for example, that
signals...