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Browse Prior Art Database

Application Programmable Mouse Buttons on a Non-Programmable Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111462D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 139K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boegel, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A work station controller provides support of host-application programmable mouse buttons on attached non-programmable terminals.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

Application Programmable Mouse Buttons on a Non-Programmable Terminal

      A work station controller provides support of host-application
programmable mouse buttons on attached non-programmable terminals.

      A Work Station Controller (WSC) supports multiple
Non-Programmable Terminals (NPTs).  WSCs can be locally attached to a
host system (via system bus), or remotely attached via some type of
communication line.  The WSC communicates with host applications via
some type of display data stream.  A WSC communicates with NPTs
across an attachment cable using a communication protocol.  Some NPTs
support the attachment of a mouse (or other pointer device).  These
NPTs could still be character-based.

      PC emulators can emulate the combination of a WSC and an
attached NPT, giving the PC user access to host-based applications.
The functions listed below describe WSC processing; however, some of
these functions are also applicable to a PC emulator running a
host-based application.

      The outbound display data stream (host to WSC) can be enhanced
to allow the application to program single mouse button events,
enabling functions like reordering of windows or selecting objects.
The outbound display data stream can also be enhanced to allow the
application to program two mouse button events, enabling functions
like moving of windows or resizing of windows.

      A host application is typically given an Attention Identifier
(AID) when the user presses certain keys on the keyboard (for
example, Enter, Help, and the Function keys).  The AID is sent to the
host in an inbound display data stream (WSC to host).  The inbound
data stream can optionally include entry field data.  When an
application programs the mouse buttons, the host defines the AID to
be returned if the user does the programmed mouse operation (button
press, release, or double click).

      Specifically, the application sends a Programmable Mouse
Buttons display data stream command to define programmable mouse
events.  The command can contain 0, 1, or multiple programmable mouse
events.  Zero events clear the programmable mouse button table in WSC
memory.

      There are 18 possible pointer device events which can be
programmed:  3 buttons (primary, secondary, and middle), times 3
types of events (button pressed, button released, and double click),
times two keyboard shift states (unshifted and shifted).  The primary
button is normally the left button, and the secondary button is
normally the right button.  For a double-click event, the WSC sees a
button-pressed event, a button-released event, a button double-click
event (within a user-specified time interval), and eventually a
button-released event.

Each programmed single event has the following parameters:

o   A flag to indicate if the text cursor should move to the location
    of the pointer device cursor when the programmed event occurs
    (note:  the location of the text...