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Flipping an Object to Switch Views from Contents to Settings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111503D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henshaw, SF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is presented to allow a user to flip a window of an object to see different views of that object. For example, a user can take the physical paradigm of seeing the front of a clock from one view, and turning it over to see the settings for that same clock.

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Flipping an Object to Switch Views from Contents to Settings

      A method is presented to allow a user to flip a window of an
object to see different views of that object.  For example, a user
can take the physical paradigm of seeing the front of a clock from
one view, and turning it over to see the settings for that same
clock.

      This idea centers around the concept of a two-sided window.
Current windows show a menu bar, title bar, and other window
ornamentation, surrounding a client area.  The client area will be
showing a view of the object, or a view of the contents of an object,
at any given time.

      In order to make it clear which side of the window a user is
looking at, an additional graphic or textual piece of information is
shown in the traditional parts of the window frame, such as in an
information area, status bar, or menu or title bar area.  This will
indicate to the user which side of the window they are currently
seeing.  For a sample implementation, see Figs. 1 and 2.

Figure 1.  Example of one side of a two sided window: contents

Figure 2.  Example of one side of a two sided window: settings

      Through the menu bar (and optionally, a graphic or textual
choice on the menu bar or title bar), a user can flip the window
around.  When this occurs, the whole window (including appropriate
ornamentation) is changed to reflect the needs of the type of view
chosen.  Some elements may change from side to side.  For example,
there...