Browse Prior Art Database

Preselection of Fonts for Different Runtime Environments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111546D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Morgan, SA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Applications often have occasion to select a font which an object uses that differs from the default font of the system on which the application is running. This may be bold-face or italics to be used to show emphasis, or a different typeface to distinguish one piece of text from another, or a different font for the entire application that the developer thinks best displays the interface. There are many reasons that a different font from the default system font would be specified for use.

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Preselection of Fonts for Different Runtime Environments

      Applications often have occasion to select a font which an
object uses that differs from the default font of the system on which
the application is running.  This may be bold-face or italics to be
used to show emphasis, or a different typeface to distinguish one
piece of text from another, or a different font for the entire
application that the developer thinks best displays the interface.
There are many reasons that a different font from the default system
font would be specified for use.

      This presents a problem for an application that will be sold
and used in today's international market.  The font appropriate for
one environment may be inappropriate for another.  Hard-coding what
font to use in the application's source code is unacceptable in this
type of market.

      The solution to this problem is to allow the application
developer to define in an external object definition file what font
is to be used in different environments.  The font definition tag
would be available for any object, and the object definition file is
read in at runtime.  When that object is created, the current runtime
environment would be determined and the font specified for that
environment would be used in presenting that object to the user.

      The font for a given environment would be fully specified,
including point size, type face and any desired special
characteristics.  The format would be that appropriate for the
operating system.  For OS/2*, this would be in strings such as
"10.Tms Rmn" or "14.Helvetica Bold Italic".

      Many different types of environments could be specified in the
font definition tag.  Fonts could be defined based on:

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