Browse Prior Art Database

Single-Click Action Buttons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111563D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In current systems, users can open an item in a container list by double-clicking with the mouse on the item. This allows the user to bypass the several steps required to interact with the menu bar to open an item. However, usability tests have shown that many users, including experienced users, have difficulty performing the double-click action. The problem is compounded when system performance is sluggish and the user does not receive immediate feedback that the double-click was successful (i.e., fast enough). The user typically responds by double-clicking again and again, until the item opens. As a result, the user may inadvertently open several instances of the window.

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Single-Click Action Buttons

      In current systems, users can open an item in a container list
by double-clicking with the mouse on the item.  This allows the user
to bypass the several steps required to interact with the menu bar to
open an item.  However, usability tests have shown that many users,
including experienced users, have difficulty performing the
double-click action.  The problem is compounded when system
performance is sluggish and the user does not receive immediate
feedback that the double-click was successful (i.e., fast enough).
The user typically responds by double-clicking again and again, until
the item opens.  As a result, the user may inadvertently open several
instances of the window.

      A technique is disclosed that would allow users to perform the
default action on container list items (typically an "Open") with a
simple single click of a mouse button.  Associated with each item in
the list would be an "Action Button."  This would be a small button,
similar in size to a radio button, next to each item in the list.
The button would have a distinguishing shape (such as a pentagon) to
differentiate it from other controls.  To perform the default action
on the item, the user would simply click once on the Action Button.
Once selected, the button would momentarily change color or emphasis
to provide feedback to the user that it was selected and the default
action will be performed.