Browse Prior Art Database

Thermoplastic Terminal Screen for Blind

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111573D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Redpath, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

IBM's constraints for SAA are logically complex for programmer construction for end-user applications. Many companies use controls for user-interface selection and assimilation. Controls provide an object-oriented approach for programming and reduce the logical complexity. They also ensure uniformity.

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Thermoplastic Terminal Screen for Blind

      IBM's constraints for SAA are logically complex for programmer
construction for end-user applications.  Many companies use controls
for user-interface selection and assimilation.  Controls provide an
object-oriented approach for programming and reduce the logical
complexity.  They also ensure uniformity.

      The current controls for IBM provide for a specific property
for object manipulation.  For a blind person manipulating these
visual objects from today's computer terminals is impossible.  To
enable the blind to manipulate computer objects, an IBM touch-screen
terminal is outfitted with a clear thermoplastic coating.  The
coating is designed to distort its texture when an electric current
is applied.  Prior art in thermoplastic coating has been developed
previously with holographic resolution for recording (900 lines per
millimeter).  The underlying technology for wiring the thermoplastic
is borrowed from LCD displays commonly used for laptop computers.  A
visual as well as a textural and thermal presentation is provided to
the user.  The terminal can be used by a visually impaired and
non-visually impaired person.