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Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Stage Telescoping Pneumatic Cylinder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111575D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a telescoping pneumatic cylinder with multiple stages and non-traditional sealing which allows an effective stroke length of twice or more the retracted height of the cylinder. This design exhibits significant advantages over the prior pneumatic cylinder art commonly available on the market in that the stroke-to-height ratio is very large. This is helpful in design applications where a linear motion source is required that can fit into a very compact space but provide a relatively long stroke.

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Multi-Stage Telescoping Pneumatic Cylinder

      Disclosed is a telescoping pneumatic cylinder with multiple
stages and non-traditional sealing which allows an effective stroke
length of twice or more the retracted height of the cylinder.  This
design exhibits significant advantages over the prior pneumatic
cylinder art commonly available on the market in that the
stroke-to-height ratio is very large.  This is helpful in design
applications where a linear motion source is required that can fit
into a very compact space but provide a relatively long stroke.

      Prior-art pneumatic cylinders typically provide a stroke that
is less than the retracted height of the body for stroke-to-height
ratio of less than 1.  Bellows-type arrangements are also available,
and while these can provide a stroke that is greater than the
retracted bellows height, they are not always suitable for precision
mechanism designs because they necessitate a separate means of
guiding the motion, and are also sometimes not ruggedized enough.
The design disclosed here does not have these constraints/drawbacks,
and can provide a stroke-to-height of 2 or greater.

      The basis of the design can be seen in the Figure.  This Figure
shows a 4-stage miniaturized configuration that was used to provide a
22 mm stroke out of an 11 mm cylinder, but other (i.e., larger,
smaller, stronger, or more/fewer stages) configurations are possible
with similar benefits.  The design of the stages is free f...