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User-Controlled Move, Copy or Delete of Menu Choices in a Graphical User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111619D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Users of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are sometimes faced with a confluence of menu choices associated with a given object. Certain choices may never be selected by the user, yet there is currently no way to conveniently remove a menu choice from a menu. Also, a user might prefer to move or copy a given menu choice to a different location. The problem with having unnecessary choices on a menu is the resulting visual clutter, which can lead to user fatigue and frustration. Current art includes the usage of short/long menus by application designers, allowing users to choose between complicated and simple menus. The user generally toggles between these modes via a menu choice, and the granularity is severely limited.

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User-Controlled Move, Copy or Delete of Menu Choices in a Graphical
User Interface

      Users of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are sometimes faced
with a confluence of menu choices associated with a given object.
Certain choices may never be selected by the user, yet there is
currently no way to conveniently remove a menu choice from a menu.
Also, a user might prefer to move or copy a given menu choice to a
different location.  The problem with having unnecessary choices on a
menu is the resulting visual clutter, which can lead to user fatigue
and frustration.  Current art includes the usage of short/long menus
by application designers, allowing users to choose between
complicated and simple menus.  The user generally toggles between
these modes via a menu choice, and the granularity is severely
limited.  Also, application designers compromise by placing menu
choices in locations most likely to please the majority of users.
Users currently have no way of moving, copying, or deleting menu
items.

      This idea takes advantage of the drag-and-drop direct
manipulation capability of modern GUIs.  If a user sees a choice in a
menu that they want to remove from the menu, the user can drag the
menu item with the mouse manipulation button (generally mouse button
two) to the shredder or waste-basket, deleting the item from the
menu.  The user can restore the menu choice to the menu at any time
by going to the object's menu setting page and adding the remembered
i...