Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Mounting of Heat Sink to Heat Source

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111622D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruber, HW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The present article describes a heat sink which is fixed or attached to a heat source like a module by magnetic force. A square frame of magnetic ferrite material is attached to the circumference of the heat sink and to the circumference of the module. The opposite polarization pattern of the 2 magnets holds the heat sink to the module with a force of 0.5 kg/cm(2). The heat sink can be an individual one per module or a large heat sink for a whole electronic assembly with flexible areas, where the heat sources are located. The flexible areas are forced into the heat sources by the magnets for maximum heat transfer. The flexible areas are made of thin copper foil layers or bundles of stranded copper wire with the necessary flexibility.

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Magnetic Mounting of Heat Sink to Heat Source

      The present article describes a heat sink which is fixed or
attached to a heat source like a module by magnetic force.  A square
frame of magnetic ferrite material is attached to the circumference
of the heat sink and to the circumference of the module.  The
opposite polarization pattern of the 2 magnets holds the heat sink to
the module with a force of 0.5 kg/cm(2).  The heat sink can be an
individual one per module or a large heat sink for a whole electronic
assembly with flexible areas, where the heat sources are located.
The flexible areas are forced into the heat sources by the magnets
for maximum heat transfer.  The flexible areas are made of thin
copper foil layers or bundles of stranded copper wire with the
necessary flexibility.

Fig. 1 shows a single module application, and in Fig. 2 modules on a
card assembly application are depicted.

The heat sink has the following advantages:

o   The heat sink does not need to be attached during module
    assembly; it can be mounted for module operation only.

o   The heat sink can be put on to respond to the required air flow
    direction in particular during testing.

o   The heat sink could overlap the module since it can be removed
    for rework and repair.

o   The card-size heat sink, with flexible heat sink areas, provides
    cooling over the whole card cross section instead of isolated
    module heat sinks with a lot of open space requir...