Browse Prior Art Database

Sharing of Context Menus between Objects to Minimize System Resource Usage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111624D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Morgan, SA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Context menus, also known as pop-up menus, are used in OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) graphical user interfaces to provide menu option selection in a contextual framework. They are currently used in the container control for the container itself and for each record in the container.

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Sharing of Context Menus between Objects to Minimize System Resource
Usage

      Context menus, also known as pop-up menus, are used in OS/2*
Presentation Manager* (PM) graphical user interfaces to provide menu
option selection in a contextual framework.  They are currently used
in the container control for the container itself and for each record
in the container.

      For applications that may have hundreds or thousands of records
in a container, the system resources required to provide a unique
context menu for each container record becomes considerable.  There
needs to be a way to provide the appropriate context menu for each
object while minimizing the system resources used in providing it.
This disclosure describes such a technique.

      The solution to this problem is to share context menus between
different objects when the context menus contain the same menu items.
This is made possible by the fact that only one context menu in the
system is ever visible to the user at a given time.  By creating only
those menus that are unique, system resource usage can be sharply
reduced.

      Each object that requires a context menu knows what the
contents of that menu should be.  This is usually defined in advance
in a menu definition file.  The menu definition is then associated
with the object, so that when its context menu is requested, it knows
what menu to display.

      An application can keep track of which unique context menus
have been created at runtime and build an internal table associating
the menu contents with the menu's unique PM window handle.  When a
context menu display request comes in to the application, the
application can check to see if a context menu with the desired
contents is already created.  If not, it creates a new one and
displays it in th...