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Browse Prior Art Database

Drop-Down List Box for Search Parameters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111627D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is provided that will allow users to enter several entities to be searched in succession. These entities may be comprised of any valid entries within an entry field on the search panel. The idea is straightforward; make the entry fields into drop-down list boxes. Users would enter names (or any other "entity") as needed and then begin the search.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 89% of the total text.

Drop-Down List Box for Search Parameters

      A technique is provided that will allow users to enter several
entities to be searched in succession.  These entities may be
comprised of any valid entries within an entry field on the search
panel.  The idea is straightforward; make the entry fields into
drop-down list boxes.  Users would enter names (or any other
"entity") as needed and then begin the search.

      To optimize the search, the system should alphabetize the
entries prior to beginning the search and then perform successive
searches from each find.  The organization of the input would follow
the organization rules of the database being searched.

      Two conditions could arise that would impact the process.  One
would be a failure in the search, in which case the user would be
notified in a message and given the opportunity to reenter that
entity, continue or terminate the search.  The other situation could
result from too many finds.  For ambiguous terms, such as "John
Smith" a list containing all of the matches would be presented to the
user for selection.

      One might also employ the drop-down list box for entry fields
other than names.  For example, one might wish to find an individual
in the context of their organization, but be uncertain exactly which
department while having a good idea that the appropriate department
is 'A' or 'B'.  One could enter both departments and get the list of
individuals in each.

      Results...