Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Multimedia Auto-Alarm Notification Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000111640D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Salahshour, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Prior methods provide mechanisms to protect objects of a system, such as hardware passwords provided by the operating system or the keyboard lock provided by the software implementation. However, intruders may attempt to break into a system by tampering with the locking mechanism, i.e., trying to enter random passwords. More importantly, many unauthorized accesses occur when the desktop of a Personal System is left unattended.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Remote Multimedia Auto-Alarm Notification Monitor

      Prior methods provide mechanisms to protect objects of a
system, such as hardware passwords provided by the operating system
or the keyboard lock provided by the software implementation.
However, intruders may attempt to break into a system by tampering
with the locking mechanism, i.e., trying to enter random passwords.
More importantly, many unauthorized accesses occur when the desktop
of a Personal System is left unattended.

      This article describes a multimedia auto-alarm notification
monitor to sound an internal and/or an external alarm to notify
owners of the computing systems of any unauthorized action attempts.
In addition, it provides a mechanism to contact the owners
automatically via Programmable Auto-Dial and/or Auto-FAX Services.
This mechanism extends the prior art of security systems by
complementing system locking mechanisms with an alarm notification
service that can be activated at the same time users lock their
systems.  The alarm can be reset after the correct
combination/password is entered.  Failure to provide the correct
combination number/password after an owner-defined number of tries,
locks the system keyboard and sounds an alarm.  The alarm can reside
in the user's system or externally attached, but under control of the
system control program.  When the alarm is activated, the only way
that it can be disengaged is by entering the correct password or
terminating the operating system, e.g., turning the power key off.

      In addition, this mechanism provides a Registry Service to
register any containers/objects that can appear on the users' desktop
that are desired to be monitored, e.g., telephone, file cabinet, etc.
Furthermore, this mechanism includes a...